Sales Target – How To Make Them Achievable As Well As Ambitious

September 29, 2022

Table of Contents

How to Achieve Your Sales Target? Read here👉🏽

Do you get a nagging feeling that most members of your sales team are not working to their full potential? Ever wondered why? 

Set SMART Sales targets.

It’s because when it comes to a sales job, “growth and comfort cannot coexist.” This means if you are only setting achievable targets for your team, then they won’t have the incentive to push their limits and give their best. And once a sales team gets into the habit of easy targets, it’s tough to get them to give their best shot. 

Setting an ambitious target is only the first step, you also have to make it achievable. Therefore your team members need the proper training, mindset, tools, and incentives. Most companies just provide essential training and set incentives and target. And when the sales team fails to achieve their targets, everyone is clueless about what went wrong.

Selling is easy, as some people might wonder. But what everyone thinks is easy might actually not come with much ease. Sales are achievable, but sometimes it can be frustrating too. Your 9-5 job may reduce your target to help you with your frustration, but what actually reduces stress is the focus. Never think of celebrating before you have actually completed a task. That after the celebration period makes the entire process of achieving sales complicated. 

What makes selling so tricky is that you can only achieve your sales goals with the help of other people. You must make appointments with people who can either buy from you or direct you to others who can. People are not under your control.

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Introduction:

The most common error a sales manager may make when setting sales targets for their team is focusing entirely on the statistics. Sure, you want to generate more sales, improve income, and aim for better effectiveness, but without a strong strategy outlining how to reach a specific set of goals, your team is unlikely to meet your target. You must also evaluate your company’s long-term business objectives. Reps may pursue weak, unproductive, high-churning offers in order to meet sales quotas. This may have significant consequences for your company’s reputation since salespeople over-promise and then under-deliver on your product or service.

Don't just ask for results, also tell them how to get there.
Don’t just ask for results, also tell them how to get there.

Notably, the figures you choose should be both reachable and inspiring. If salespeople believe their expectations are unrealistic and unattainable, they may devote more time to applying for other employment than working on meeting your revenue targets. In this post, we’ll look at how to create sales objectives, as well as how to empower and train your sales team to meet them. We’ll also explore how to use data to develop sales goals, so you can choose realistic targets for your sales team and create reasonable predictions for your firm.

How can you set data-driven, intelligent goals?

When developing sales targets, use the SMART technique to guide your strategy.

Specific: A clear statement of your aim and how you intend to attain it.

Measurable: Make sure that the aim can be measured.

Achievable: Make sure it’s not too difficult or stressful to achieve.

Realistic: Make sure it corresponds with your organization’s overall business goals.

Time-bound: Establish realistic time frames for achieving your goals.

As a checklist, use these elements to validate your projected sales objectives and targets. Finally, you want these objectives to inspire your staff to beat expectations and propel your company to new heights of success.

As an employer, it is your job to push your employees for the better. You would also love to achieve more than usual to benefit the company. But the best way to make their limits and achieve targets is by striking a balance. Giving your staff a quota without an action plan to attain that amount is unrealistic and ineffective. While it is crucial to push your team to accomplish goals, you must also be realistic and strategic.

Learning to Control: A Sales Process

You are bound to come across salespeople who direct their frustration into motivation to do more. They say that frustration helps them when selling and achieving targets. But that does not work for all. People fail to stay motivated throughout their sales processes. That is why control and balance should be incorporated while working. 

If you continue to focus on selling, you will be disappointed if you do not meet that target. As an alternative, why not establish a daily target of making qualifying prospecting calls? You may handle this by scheduling those calls. You can also identify the appropriate prospects for whom you want to sell your business. You can create a helpful phone introduction that offers the opportunity for a reason to pay attention. It is within your ability to generate those calls. 

Make data a goal-setting companion.

make data a goal setting companion
You can count on the numbers

Allow statistics to guide your aims. Examine the most outstanding sales representatives’ historical growth rates and performance. Also, divide the objective into manageable bits.

Try utilizing driver trees: a graphical slide that tells your sales staff how you arrived at that number using the inputs which they control. For instance, if you contact X leads this quarter and assume a Y exchange rate and a Z average transaction size, you will have met your goal.

Stepping backwards from your company’s yearly sales objective provides a realistic perspective of the actions necessary to achieve the desired outcome and aids in determining what is attainable.

Let’s conduct some fast arithmetic using a goal-setting scenario for a salesman.

Examine a team member’s prior performance to determine how many calls, emails, or meetings with clients they generally require to clinch a transaction. If it takes them ten calls to consummate a transaction, their close rate is 10%. Determine how many calls are needed to reach their goal. They must make 500 phone calls if they want to close 50 transactions this year. When broken down into smaller goals, that equates to an average of 40 calls each month or ten conversations per week. Trying to break down your annual objective into small monthly or weekly portions helps give your sales staff a feeling of urgency.

set small goals and achieve them everyday
Source: Clickup

Set small goals to reach larger ones.

You can’t control the outcomes in sales, but you can control the activities and inputs to the process. Setting just measurable sales targets might be detrimental to your team and your bottom line. Set modest sales activity targets that will help you progressively attain the larger ones.

Instead of informing your agent that they need to complete 50 transactions this year to reach the quota, remind them that they have a link-building activity objective of making Ten cold calls & delivering five follow-up emails per week. Results-oriented goals may be intimidating and make representatives feel out of control, so encourage your team to take control of their activities with practical everyday tasks.

Setting attainable sales goals that your sales staff can manage is critical to increasing morale, motivation, and confidence. This can also hopefully maintain your team on course throughout the entire year, allowing you to monitor their development.

Remember that no two sales representatives are the same. Skill sets, strengths, and experience will all differ. Keep this thought in mind when you work with your members of the team to establish realistic goals for meeting their quota.

Inform and motivate your sales staff.

When setting targets for your salespeople, don’t allow revenue to take over. Instead, consider developing goals that will motivate your staff to sell more effectively.

Speak with them regarding their strengths, flaws, and opportunities for improvement. It might be as essential as enhancing product presentations or increasing confidence through executive dialogues. Make time to educate your team and develop goals to assist them in reaching their both personal and professional objectives.

How to Outperform Your Sales Goals

Outperform your sales goals
Strategize well to outperform your sales goals.

To begin, plan ahead of time to develop your strategy and, more crucially, prepare for failure. No sales manager intends to fail, yet obstacles are an unavoidable aspect of doing business.

Meticulous planning evaluates not just what assets you have in place to reach your goals but also the gaps and impediments.

Having a proactive plan in place to cope with failures puts you in a solid position to troubleshoot rapidly. Your strategy does not have to be extensive; simply follow this simple procedure.

Make the data your goal-setting companion.

Allow statistics to guide your aims. Examine the most outstanding sales representatives’ historical growth rates and performance. Also, divide the objective into manageable bits.

Try utilizing driver tree branches: a graphical slide that tells your sales staff how you arrived at that number using the inputs which they control. For instance, if you contact X prospects this month and assume a Y conversion and a Z average transaction size, you will have met your goal.

Going backwards from your company’s yearly sales objective provides a realistic perspective of the actions necessary to achieve the desired outcome and aids in determining what is attainable.

Let’s conduct some fast arithmetic using a goal-setting scenario for a salesman.

  • Examine a team member’s prior performance to determine how many calls, emails, or meetings with clients they generally require to clinch a transaction.
  • If it takes them ten phone calls to consummate a transaction, their completion rate is 10%.
  • Determine how many calls are required to reach their goal.
  • They must make 500 phone calls if they want to close 50 transactions this year.
  • When broken down into smaller goals, that equates to an average of 40 calls each month or Ten calls a week.

Trying to break down your annual objective into tiny monthly or weekly portions helps give your sales staff a feeling of urgency.

Set small goals to reach larger ones.

You didn’t know the outcomes in sales, but you have control of the activities and inputs to the process.

Setting just measurable sales targets might be detrimental to your team and your bottom line. Set modest sales activity targets that will help you progressively attain the larger ones.

Instead of informing your agent that they need to complete 50 transactions this year to reach the quota, remind them that they have a direct marketing activity objective of making ten sales calls and delivering five follow-up emails per week. Results-oriented goals may be intimidating and make representatives feel out of control, so encourage your team to take control of their activities with practical everyday tasks.

Setting attainable sales goals that your sales staff can manage is critical to increasing morale, motivation, and confidence. This can also help to keep your team focused year-round, allowing you to monitor their development.

Remember that no two sales representatives are the same. Skill sets, strengths, and experience will all differ. Bear this in mind when you work with your members of the team to establish realistic goals for meeting their quota.

Inform and motivate your sales staff.

When setting targets for your salespeople, don’t allow revenue to take over. Instead, consider developing goals that will motivate your staff to sell more effectively.

Speak with them about their skills, flaws, and opportunities for improvement. It might be as essential as enhancing product presentations or increasing confidence through executive dialogues. Make time to coach your team and develop goals to assist them in reaching their professional and personal objectives.

Ensure that your staff understands your products, the sales forecasting, the average sales cycle, and the overall sales approach. Include them in meetings about targets as they’re on the front lines every day, talking to customers and carrying forth sales operations. Including their comments in your judgment not only helps you establish better objectives but also fosters a spirit of collaboration and collaboration.

Your staff wants to know that you care enough about them to invest in them. In the long term, encouraging your team to improve professionally and listening to their feedback will result in higher performance, and more objectives met.

How to Outperform Your Sales Goals

To begin, plan ahead of time to develop your strategy and, more crucially, prepare for failure. No sales manager intends to fail, yet obstacles are an unavoidable aspect of doing business.

Meticulous planning evaluates not just what assets you have in place to reach your goals but also the gaps and impediments.

Having a proactive plan in place to cope with failures puts you in a solid position for troubleshooting rapidly. Your strategy does not have to be extensive; simply follow this simple procedure.

Identify success barriers: Determine what is preventing you from accomplishing your objectives.

Examine your team: Will they have the necessary skill sets, competencies, and procedures in place to achieve their goals? Is further sales training required, and if so, do you have the means to give it?

Conduct market research.

Conduct market research

You must also understand the market, the target audience, the need for your product or service, and the competitors.

Once you’ve identified your most significant potential hurdles, including internal and external, you could more easily devise a strategy to overcome them and place yourself and your team in command.

Create structure and support.

Setting and tracking sales targets for your team isn’t enough to get results. As a sales manager, setting goals for oneself is essential here.

Concentrate your objectives on the steps you can take to enable your sales staff to exceed their targets.

Your first aim should be to put in place the correct infrastructure to support straightforward pipeline management and effective selling.

Sales representatives that are mired down by admin really aren’t spending their time where it counts the most. Automation is essential for keeping your sales team focused on selling tasks. Having the right CRM in place allows sales managers and representatives to be particular and assess progress. Effective sales reporting provides the insights and data required to improve procedures and increase productivity.

You also cannot overlook the importance of getting face contact with your sales crew. While managing your team and focusing on goals is crucial, they should also regard you as a teacher and sales coach.

Take the effort to ensure that your staff knows their objectives and how to attain them.

Do they have faith in the objectives you’ve set for them?

Do they anticipate any difficulties?

Where do they require your assistance?

Regular one-on-one and team meetings let you evaluate performance, discuss issues, share learnings, and celebrate accomplishments.

Goals should be prioritized.

We’ve already addressed how activity-based objectives may help your team reclaim control, but now you must assist them in prioritizing these goals.

Determine which goals provide the most value or have the most effect, and urge your salespeople to focus their efforts appropriately. This should include duties that are most important to their professional ambitions and the bottom line of the organization.

Reward your staff for exceptional performance.

The team works better when their achievements are appreciated.

Performance-based incentives and incentives are essential for achieving the most significant outcomes for your team.

It’s a no-brainer: Set sales goals for your staff.

However, monetary rewards should not be used as the primary means of positive reinforcement. Consider strategies to recognize smaller action goals and milestones, like upsells and client retention successes. This will motivate your staff to sign off on the correct clients and focus on the customer lifecycle while also increasing morale.

Celebrating rapid closures that don’t result in long-term clients isn’t good for your team or your company.

While creating realistic objectives is vital for team spirit, Pepper believes that using stretch goals is a crucial strategy for success.

Sales managers should set challenging targets for themselves and their teams. However, if every objective you set is a push goal, you will set yourself and your team up to fail. There’s nothing wrong with pushing your staff to go above and beyond, but make sure you encourage their efforts and establish more reasonable targets at the same time.

How sales representatives may avoid and deal with stress

Stress is nothing new to salespeople. Sales is an elevated, results-oriented, and performance-oriented job. There is a lot of uncertainty, a lot of rejection, and a lot of pressure to fulfil sales objectives.

Many salesmen depend on commissions to cover their expenses.

Your monetary well-being and the success of the firm are frequently entirely contingent on your performance. The desire to convert rapidly and meet sales objectives is intense.

Sales managers must assist their sales teams in dealing with this strain. This is crucial not just for your team’s health and well-being but also for your own production and the future prosperity of your company.

Finding a happy medium

A little tension isn’t always a bad thing. This emotion might urge us to push ourselves and build momentum in order to meet sales targets.

What happens, though, when this tension spirals out of control?

As a sales manager, you must apply some stress to generate healthy enthusiasm, but you must do it without jeopardizing your team’s health.

Stress is hazardous. It may be immensely detrimental to your employees’ mental, physical, and emotional well-being. Stress-related illnesses can have far-reaching implications.

That is why stress should never be underestimated.

Recognize your stressors.

Before we go into sales stress management, let’s look at some of the core issues. Prevention is always preferable to cure.

The following are only a few of the many stress-inducing variables that regularly enter a salesperson’s everyday life:

  • Financial concern
  • Having difficulty meeting quotas
  • Rejection
  • A clogged pipeline
  • Inadequate leadership/management
  • Unattainable goals
  • a scarcity of resources
  • Toxic working conditions
  • failing to live up to expectations
  • It is critical to assess your stress triggers in order to manage them successfully.
Every one can manage stress in their own ways

Everyone feels stressed, but being self-aware enough to understand how you think and manage stress is the first step toward conquering it.

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Last thoughts

When determining how to design sales objectives, remember that SMART goals prioritize measurable actions above outcomes. Your team is prone to lose excitement and momentum if there are no clear goals to strive toward. This will have a significant influence on both performance and revenue.

You may use this formula in your plan and adopt an action-oriented manner whether you’re a startup, small firm, or sales staff in a huge corporation.

That is how you can establish wiser objectives that your team and you can regularly achieve.

Setting both challenging and realistic sales targets can inspire your staff to strive for excellence, resulting in long-term prosperity for your company.

Article Author

Afnan Haroon is Sr. Marketer, Creative Content Strategist, and handles TeleCRM branding. She has been crucial in growing TeleCRM from scratch to a successful startup. Known for crafting engaging campaigns and impactful content. Afnan's work helps sales teams excel with TeleCRM's innovative solutions.